Ancestors of Frank Albin Bottger


picture

First Generation  Next





1. Frank Albin Bottger,1 son of Johann Albin Bottger 2 and Sarah C. Plunkett,2 was born on 24 Jan 1903 in Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States,2 died on 20 Feb 1961 in Philomath, Benton, Oregon, United States3 at age 58, and was buried on 24 Feb 1961 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.2 The cause of his death was asphyxiation - drowning while raccoon hunting.2

Death Notes:
Oregon Vital Records, Death Index

Name: Bottger, Frank
County: Benton
Death Date: 20 Feb 1961
Certificate: 1317
Spouse: Lola
Age: 58


Gazette Times, Corvallis, Or. Wed Feb 22, 1961 article:
Funeral Services for Fank A. Bottger, who drowned Monday nite while hunting raccoon, will be held in the chapel of McHenry Funeral Home, Friday at 2pm with Rev. Charles Neville of the Good Samaritan Episcopal church officiating.

Burial Notes: Burial-Oaklawn Cemetery, Benton County, Corvallis, Oregon
Block #3, Section 28, Lot #2, Burial on 24 Feb 1961.

General Notes:
Frank spend a majority of his working life working in the lumber industry at lumber mills owned by Mr. Ed Albertsen also working on farms owned by Mr. Ed Albertsen in the Silver Lake, Summer Lake area of central Oregon.

He loved to be outside, hunting & fishing. He loved taking his grandchildren along on his hunting and fishing trips.

Remembrances of Frank (called "PaPa") by George Davidson:
Some earliest memory was about 1949 while we lived at the old Schriber (not sure of spelling) house- across from Ed Albertsen's lumber mill..PaPa had skinned a raccoon and gave me the hide and tail to make a raccoon hat just like Davy Crockett!
PaPa showed me how to nail the skin to a board/stretched out with I think was a powder and salt to cure...we made a great hat..however, I remember it sure had an awful smell!! I would at times go across the road to the lumber mill when PaPa was working and hope he would spend a whole five cents and buy me a coke from the brand new coke machine at the mill office.
PaPa loved to hunt and fish..I think he had me carrying a rifle and fishing pole just as soon as I was able to walk. He would often pick me up after school or early evenings on Fri or Sat night to go raccoon hunting with his coon dogs (usually two dogs). We would all pile in his Nash Rambler auto and head out to find the pesky raccoons that were getting into a farmers chicken pens etc...PaPa had taught me to tell when the dogs were just trailing a raccoon and also to tell when they had the raccoon treed just by the type of barking of the dogs. One time..PaPa had me shoot the raccoon out of the tree with the old 4-10 shotgun for the first time...I don't remember if I hit the raccoon or not..but I sure hit my butt on the ground as the shotgun had a kick. Sometimes the dogs would catch a skunk..and wow the dogs would smell bad..and after putting the dogs in the car..Grandma Lola would have a fit..and take the car keys away from PaPa until he cleaned up the car and get that awful skunk smell out of the car. (He use a lot of tomato juice in cleaning the dogs up).
At the beginning of deer season each year...I would have to get an Ok from the school teacher to be absent for a week as PaPa and Grandma LoLa would take me along and sometimes it would be a multi family trip..to central Oregon and set up camp. We had our tents, cook stoves, and plenty of food. Grandma Lola would always cook up a feast for everyone. I remember the cold and at times icy nights but warm sunny afternoons. It was great to have someone actually kill their deer and have PaPa show me how to dress it out, hang it up to cure a few days..and later skin it before we would cut it up for packing in the freezer for venison steaks and best of all, smoked venison jerky. Grandma Lola would always make me complete any reading or homework that had been assigned by my school teacher.
Fishing was about the same as deer hunting, we made many trips just the two of us and at times family camping for a several day fishing trip. PaPa's favorite fishing was at the central Oregon lakes...he would find his favorite site and set anchor and still fish. At times if we had a motor on the boat..we would troll for fish.
PaPa loved his Olympia Beer...it was a must, all the time..and he would save the empty bottles until there was an awful collection at which time he would call me over to visit and we would pack them up and redeem them for 1 cent apiece. Usually the big cash would end up in my pockets for soda pop or comic books.
Mom tells me that when I was still young and still getting milk from a baby bottle once and a while..usually while on a trip..after watching PaPa toss his empty Olympia beer bottle out the car window...I surprised all by doing the same with my milk bottle.
I think PaPa's favorite time of the year was Christmas..when he would have all the grand kids over for a Christmas meal and see us all open our packages.
PaPa and Grandma was one of the first in our family to own a T.V. We would love to visit so we could watch Lassie or Walt Disney . PaPa loved boxing..and he would sit and watch boxing for hours and eat grapes, cheese and of course drink his favorite beverage "Oly".
About 1959-1960 PaPa and Lola would work for Uncle Ed Albertson-for the summer months and set irrigation pipes on Alfalfa farms near Silver Lake and Summer Lake, Oregon. PaPa and I would set the pipes (40 foot lengths) twice a day every day. We lived in a small house with a bunk house near by for myself. Grandma Lola would do the cooking to feed us. In our spare time, we would listen to the radio and often just walk the desert looking for Indian Arrow Heads. We found many and it was great to find a "chipping ground area" where the Indians would find natural up cropping of obsidian (volcanic glass usually black) that they would use to make their arrow heads. These areas would yield many broken arrow heads but often some great whole arrow heads. I had a collection of many sizes, arrow heads, hide scrapers, spearheads etc...that I donated to the Philomath Museum. An old timer in the area showed me how the Indians used a deer antler to chip away the stone and make the arrow heads..I had fun making them but the splinters of obsidian glass was sharp and would cut your fingers.
Spending the summer months out in the desert was a real experience..very quiet and different. At night the stars were so bright you could almost see to walk..the wildlife was unreal..I never realized how much there was in the desert..the many kinds of birds, coyotes, deer, and even a big old black bear. One day PaPa decided he wanted antelope meat..so he shot one..it was not in season so we had to dress it out, skin it, and cut it up in a hurry. PaPa was so afraid the game warden would find out..we had a freezer full and ate it seems three times a day to get rid of the evidence! We usually would get two cuttings of hay from the fields a summer. It would not be unusual to find the sprinklers would have a sheet of ice all over in the mornings..and it would be 85-90 degrees in the afternoon.
I don't remember now how much Uncle Ed paid me, but it was enough to buy my school clothes and supplies each year. Uncle Ed had loaned me $50 one school year before, and I found out after my first paycheck that summer, the $50 was taken out of my pay..he never forgot! I had used the $50 to buy a transistor radio that I carried with me while working- to listen to baseball games and try to keep up with what was going on in the world while we were living out in the middle of the Oregon Desert. We had an old Alice Chalmers Tractor (hand crank to start) that we used to move large loads of pipe before they cut the hay.

Memories of Wren, Oregon-by The Wren Historical Society, Wren, Oregon Nov 1998 (Nellie Stark,Karen Kennedy, Pat Brown, Elmer Taylor, Dean Sartain, & Jim Hoyt:
Wildlife section and reference to: Frank Bottger:
Another time, Frank Bottger had shot a deer illegally. He was about to store the deer in the shed when he heard a vehicle approaching. It was the game warden! Frank panicked. He told his wife to get in bed and he put the deer carcass in bed with her! When he opened the door, he told the game warden that his wife was in bed, sick, but he was welcome to come in!
The game warden decided to go on his way and not disturb a poor sick woman!
Old Frank liked to drink a bit. He and Pat Brown were out hunting one time and they spotted a couple of raccoons in a tree. Now Frank liked raccoon. He put on his rain coat and slipped gingerly into the blackberry bushes under the tree. He told old Pat to shoot the branch out from under the coon, which Pat promptly did. But, unexpectedly, the coons fell directly on top of Frank in the berry bushes and began to fight and claw. As Frank tried to get away from the two little varmints, there was enough clawing, shouting and curses to still echo around these hills today!
Another time his son, John Bottger came into Wren with a couple of raccoons
on leashes. Some dogs came to investigate and the coons climbed up a cut-off phone pole, just out of reach. The baying and howling was ear-rending as the dogs tried to get at the coons. At one time, coon hunting with dogs was permitted in the area, but this is no longer legal.

The following note collected from Benton County,Oregon,Web Site ..Interviews..Mr. and Mrs. Jasper HAMAR June,1938

Jasper HAMAR and his wife were interviewed at the home in the village of Summit, where they are living in retirement. They had little information of early days, but their recollections seemed to be dependable.
My grandfather, Oliver HAMAR, came west by railroad to San Francisco and then north to Oregon. He took a homestead on upper Marys River, on the east fork above where BOTTGER now lives. At that time Preacher BAUGHMAN lived on BOTTGER'S place and Dr. OWENS lived on the adjoining place. Unlike the country nearer to Summit there was timber there except on the small meadows of the river bottoms.
My mother was Mary McLAUGHLIN. Her children were Rhoda, Julia (Mrs. FRANTZ), Amelia (Mrs. STONE), Emma (Mrs. McGALLEY), David, Newton, myself, Andrew, and Esther (Mrs. CARLSON, Mrs. CUSICK). I was born in 1873.
I had all my schooling in the Summit schoolhouse, which was then about a mile north of the present location. I went only part of two terms. My teachers were Nettie PITTMAN and Etta WOOD. I spent most of my time as a boy working on the ranch. After I was fifteen I used to work in harvest time in Kings Valley. That was the only cash work to be had, for lumbering had not yet developed. One of the few mills in the country was at Hoskins. This mill cut much of the timber for the first building of the State College plant at Corvallis. They used to deliver lumber by wagon as far away as Independence.
Most of Kings Valley then raised grain and hay. The yields were good but the methods of farming were bad. The fields came to be very foul with weeds and especially with wild oats. The old horse power thrashing machines were in use then. I remember MORGAN SAVAGE, one of the first settlers on the upper Mary's River, had an old tread mill thrasher. The motive power was furnished by a team on a treadmill.
The dances and parties meant a great deal to us then, for there was little chance for the young people to meet and enjoy themselves. Baseball was not known and our only outdoor sports were hunting and fishing. Trout were plentiful in the river then, many of them being twelve to fourteen inches long.
The elk were gone when we came but deer were still plentiful. The country was simply lousy with panthers and bob cats. Raccoons and bears were common and the beaver had their dams all along the streams. Matthew KELLY, one of the very first settlers, spent most of his time trapping. His pal, Joe WOOD, had a ranch. Neither of the two were ever married and they left no heirs. They were buried in the May's, now called the Strouts', burying ground about a mile west of Summit.
When I was about twenty-eight I got the notion to homestead a quarter section of timber. Timber land was open to homestead entry then. I went up to Bend in the pine country but found all the desirable timber located. The same things was true at Siletz. Finally I bought a relinquishment from a man on the East Fork of Marys River. I proved up after seven years. We always took the full time allowed to make final proof, for as soon as the Government gave us a patent we had to begin paying taxes on the land, I paid taxes for twenty years but finally sold the place for ten thousand dollars.
I have been a timber faller most of my life, and have seen the logging business develop and adopt new methods. We used oxen at first to get the logs out of the woods, because they could get around on the brushy hillsides better. We did not have to spend so much time and effort cutting the brush as if we had used horses. This clearing away of the brush is what we called 'swamping'. Later horses came into use more, for they are faster. Dave SIMPSON and his brother used the first donkey engine ever seen in this vicinity. PRESCOTT and Van NESS logged off the timber on MORGAN SAVAGE'S place to be used in the construction of the Yaquina railroad. SAVAGE had one of the few tracts of old growth fir left in the upper Marys River country. Most of the timber had been destroyed in the big burn of 1840.
MORGAN SAVAGE ran a blacksmith shop. He used to keep a stallion for public service. He bought a MORGAN horse, the first pure bred horse ever brought to this section. There were no purebred cattle until much later.
In my younger days I spent most of twenty years away from here, working the Willamette Valley, in eastern Oregon, and once as far north as Seattle. In 1907 I married LEONA PARKER at Brownsville We have one son, Oliver Perl, who lives here with us.

Noted events in his life were:

• Education: Old Fern Ridge School, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Occupation: Lumber Mill and Farm Labor for Mr. Edward A. Albertsen. 2

• Census: 20 Apr 1910, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 4

• Census: 8 Jan 1920, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Occupation: Sawmill Laborer, 17 Apr 1930, Hoskins, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Occupation: Farmer, Apr 1940, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States. 5

• Social Security Number: 540-07-4065, 1961. 2

Frank married Lola Pearl Ball,6 daughter of Leslie Pearl Ball 8 and Cora Elizabeth Miller,9 on 7 Apr 1923 in Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States.7 Lola was born on 24 Oct 1906 in Independence, Polk, Oregon, United States,10 died on 24 Feb 1966 in Philomath, Benton, Oregon, United States11 at age 59, and was buried on 28 Feb 1966 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States. The cause of her death was Natural Causes.

Marriage Notes: Oregon State Archives:
9-043b Name Ball, Lola & Bottger, Frank A Date 1923 Record Type Marriage County Benton Source Genealogical

Oregon State Archives:

Case# 9-043b Name Ball, Lola & Bottger, Frank A Date 1923 Record Type Marriage County Benton Source Genealogical
Marriage by Reverand R.J. Phelps at the home of Lola Ball in Independence, Polk County, Oregon.

Benton County, Oregon Marriage Index:
Spouse: Lola Ball
Date: 7 Apr 1923
B/G: Groom
Source: Book:9 Page:43b
County and State: Benton Co. OR

Oregon, Marriage Index, 1906-2009:
Name: Lola Ball Marriage Date: 7 Apr 1923 Marriage Place: Benton, Oregon, USA

Noted events in their marriage were:

• Census: 17 Apr 1930, Hoskins, Benton, Oregon, United States. 12

• Residence: 1 Apr 1935, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Census: Apr 1940, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States. 5

• Residence: 28 Aug 1941, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Residence: 1 Sep 1941, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Residence: 463 W. South Philomath, 1951, Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Residence: NE Corner West South at South C St., 1953, Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Residence: West South Philomath, 1956, Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.

Death Notes:
Oregon Vital Records:

Name: Bottger, Lola P
County: Benton
Death Date: 24 Feb 1966
Certificate: 1672
Spouse: Frank

Obituary-Corvallis, Benton County, Oregon
A long time Benton County resident. Born in Independence Oregon and received her education at Dallas,Airlie & Summit. Married Frank Albin Bottger on April 7,1923 at Summit where they made their home until 1941 when they moved to hilomath,Oregon. Lola was employed by O.S.U. after Frank has passed away in 1961. She was a member of the E.U.B. Church of Philomath and the Philomath Rebekah Lodge.

Lola's funeral services were held at the McHenry Funeral Home,Corvallis,Oregon and burial at the Oaklawn Memorial Park Cemetery.

Burial Notes:
Burial-Oaklawn Cemetery, Benton Co., Corvallis, Oregon

Block #3, Section 28, Lot #3, Burial on 28 Feb 1966.

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: Apr 1910, , Crook County, Oregon, United States.

• Residence: 9 Feb 1912, Independence, Polk, Oregon, United States.

• Census: 1920, Dallas, Polk, Oregon, United States.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  John Albin Bottger was born on 8 May 1924 in Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States, died on 6 Jan 2012 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States at age 87, and was buried on 20 Jan 2012 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon, United States.

         ii.  Mary Pearl Bottger 13 was born on 20 Mar 1925 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States,13 died on 16 Aug 2008 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States13 at age 83, and was buried on 21 Aug 2008 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.14 The cause of her death was Dementia, Renal Failure.

        iii.  Merle Annie Bottger Living

         iv.  Frances Louise Bottger was born on 30 Apr 1930 in Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States, died on 12 Aug 2001 in Albany, Linn, Oregon, United States at age 71, and was cremated on 17 Aug 2001 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.

          v.  Ann Corrine Bottger 15 was born on 15 Aug 1939 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States,16 died on 17 Jan 1943 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon, United States17 at age 3, and was buried on 27 Jan 1943 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States. The cause of her death was complications from aspirated peanut into left lung.15


picture

previous  Second Generation  Next






2. Johann Albin Bottger,2 son of Karl Gottfried Bottger 18 and Amelia Harnish Hautsch,19 was born on 9 Apr 1865 in Burgstadt, Saxony, Germany,20 died on 24 Jul 1949 in Philomath, Benton, Oregon, United States21 at age 84, and was buried on 26 Jul 1949 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.19 The cause of his death was Pneumonia and Uremia.19 Other names for Johann were J. A. Bottger and22 John A. Bottger.23

Birth Notes: Frances Louise Bottger's growing up book shows birth: 9 Apr 1865, Burkersdorf, Germany

Death Notes:
Oregon Vital Records, Death Index
Name: Bottger, John ASpouse Name: Sarah
Death Date: 24 Jul 1949County: BentonBirth Date: Age:
Certificate No.: 7133Comments: -



Burial Notes:
Oaklawn Cemetery, Corvallis, Benton Co., Oregon:
Buried 26 Jul 1949, b. 1865, d. 1949, block 4, section 74, lot 4.

Newspaper Obituary:
Came to USA at age 17 to Missouri for a short time. Moved to Portland, Oregon then Benton Co., Oregon where he homesteaded near Summit, Benton Co. Warner-McHenry Funeral Home, Corvallis, Benton County, Oregon.

General Notes:
Gustave WINKLER
Interview taken from Benton County Records

July 8, 1938

Mr. WINKLER was interviewed at his home at Nashville Station, where he is living next door to his daughter, Mrs. GRUSING. Although he was not one of the very early settlers he had interesting information of early times and conditions.

(Said Mr. WINKLER:) I was born in Saxony in 1860. I came to Oregon in 1888. A friend, John BOTTGER, had come before me and I came direct to where he lived on the east fork of Marys River. There I took a homestead, joining BOTTGER's and raised cattle. My land lay back from the stream and was hilly. The country was well settled then but it is going back to the wild now. In the early days we worked hard but we never worried about making a living. There were deer in the woods, fish in the streams, and milk from our cows. On the Yaquina one day I caught 84 trout from two holes, and then quit fishing.

I was the first dairyman on the Upper Marys River, and the first to introduce the raising of Kale there. The neighbors were inclined to be skeptical and to make fun of the new plant. They were convinced when they saw the growth it made. I always tried to take advantage of what the State College could tell me.

My wife was Anna LOHMAN. Our children are Walter, who is a railroad man at Grants Pass; Max, a truck driver in Portland; and Elfreida (GRUSING).

One of our neighbors on Marys River was an Englishman named COOTE. He was not related to that other Englishman who was one of the early professors of Agriculture at the State College in Corvallis. When this man learned that my mother had unmarried sisters in Germany he furnished money to pay the passages of Grandmother LOHMANN and her two daughters. He married one of them and found a husband for the other. They are all buried in the cemetery at Summit and I am the only one left.

BLM Land records, Oregon:
Names
Patentee: JOHN A BOTTGER
Survey
State: OREGON
Acres: 160
Metes/Bounds: No
Title Transfer
Issue Date: 4/19/1894
Land Office: OREGON CITY
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: Yes
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: May 20, 1862: HOMESTEAD ENTRY-ORIGINAL (12 Stat. 392)
Document Numbers
Document Nr.: 3776
Accession/Serial Nr.: OROCAA 022724
BLM Serial Nr.: OROCAA 022724

Names

Patentee: JOHN A BOTTGER
Survey
State: OREGON
Acres: 40
Metes/Bounds: No
Title Transfer
Issue Date: 6/3/1908
Land Office: PORTLAND
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: Yes
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: April 24, 1820: SALE-CASH ENTRY (3 Stat. 566)
Document Numbers
Document Nr.: 9752
Accession/Serial Nr.: ORPAA 022745
BLM Serial Nr.: ORPAA 022745

Courtesy of Sherry Bottger Fish-Nov 2009

Great Gran'Pa John Bottger told his family (as told to me by my father, John A. Bottger) that he worked for a newspaper, as a child in Germany, delivering newspapers with the family dog who pulled a cart. At some point, his mother, Amelia, became ill, and the doctor told the family, she must have fresh meat in order to survive. Great Gran'pa John then had to pull the newspaper cart himself. Also, he related in conversations with his family that his parents (apparently at least middle-class)owned a home in town as well as property (maybe 1/2 hector? or so) out of town on which they raised produce. Another time, he mentioned he had also apprenticed in a bakery before coming to America.



Noted events in his life were:

• Occupation: Farmer.

• Religion: Lutheran Church.

• Occupation: barkeeper, 1878-1881, Portland, Multnomah, Oregon, United States.

• Immigration: to the United States, 1882. 24

• Naturalization: 31 Dec 1886, , Yamhill County, Oregon, United States.

• Occupation: Salmon Fisherman with Jack Thompson on the Columbia River, 1899, Harlan, Lincoln, Oregon, United States.

• Census: 28 Jun 1900, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 24

• Census: 20 Apr 1910, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 4

• Census: 8 Jan 1920, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States. 4

• Census: Apr 1930, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States. 25

Johann married Louisa Pfeil on 2 Dec 1890 in , Benton County, Oregon, United States.7 Louisa was born about 1870.

Marriage Notes:
Benton County, Oregon Marriage Index:
Spouse: Louisa PFEIL
Date: 2 Dec 1890
B/G: Groom
Source: Book:6 Page:254
County and State: Benton Co. OR

Have not found out status-was this a divorce or annuled?


Johann next married Sarah C. Plunkett 2 on 14 Jan 1899 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.26 Sarah was born on 10 Jul 1878 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States, died on 16 Apr 1965 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States27 at age 86, and was buried on 19 Apr 1965 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.

Marriage Notes:
Oregon State Archives:
Case# 7-103a Name: Plunkett, Sarah & Bottger, J A. Date: 1899 Record Type: Marriage County: Benton

Benton County, Oregon Marriage Index:
Spouse: Sarah PLUNKETT
Date: 14 Jan 1899
B/G: Groom
Source: Book:7 Page:103a
County and State: Benton Co. OR


Collection: Oregon Marriages, 1853-1935
Groom's Name: J. A. Bottger
Groom's Birth Date:
Groom's Birthplace:
Groom's Age:
Bride's Name: Sarah Plunkett
Bride's Birth Date:
Bride's Birthplace:
Bride's Age:
Marriage Date: 14 Jan 1899
Marriage Place: , Benton, Oregon
Groom's Father's Name:
Groom's Mother's Name:
Bride's Father's Name:
Bride's Mother's Name:
Groom's Race:
Groom's Marital Status:
Groom's Previous Wife's Name:
Bride's Race:
Bride's Marital Status:
Bride's Previous Husband's Name:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M59384-1
System Origin: Oregon-VR
Source Film Number: 908958
Reference Number: 2:1JDHWXV




Noted events in their marriage were:

• Census: 28 Jun 1900, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 24

• Census: 20 Apr 1910, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 4

• Census: 8 Jan 1920, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States. 4

• Residence: 20 Jun 1925, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Census: Apr 1930, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States. 25

• Residence: 1 Apr 1935, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Census: Apr 1940, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States. 28

• Property: their home with a value of $1,200, Apr 1940, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Annulled: 1949, Philomath, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Residence: 354 E. Main, 1953, Philomath, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Residence: Feb 1957, Philomath, Benton, Oregon, United States. 29

• Residence: 1958, Philomath, Benton, Oregon, United States.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  Alice Amelia Bottger 30 was born on 22 Jul 1900 in Hoskins, Benton, Oregon, United States,30 died on 29 Apr 1984 in Bend, Deschutes, Oregon, United States31 at age 83, and was cremated in 1984 in Powell Butte, Crook, Oregon, United States.30

         ii.  Mary Bottger 32 was born on 31 Aug 1901 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States,33 died on 31 Jan 1906 in Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States34 at age 4, and was buried in 1906 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. The cause of her death was cerebral meningitis.

1       iii.  Frank Albin Bottger 2 (born on 24 Jan 1903 in Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States - died on 20 Feb 1961 in Philomath, Benton, Oregon, United States)

         iv.  Annie Ashna Bottger was born on 4 Jan 1906 in Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States,35 died on 17 Apr 1997 in Philomath, Benton, Oregon, United States18 at age 91, and was buried in Apr 1997 in Powell Butte, Crook, Oregon, United States.

          v.  Edna May Bottger was born on 9 Nov 1908 in Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States,36 died on 16 May 1997 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States37 at age 88, and was buried in May 1997 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.

         vi.  Velma Irene Bottger 22 (Twin) was born on 10 May 1916 in Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States,38 died on 21 Feb 1917 in , Benton County, Oregon, United States,39 and was buried on 22 Feb 1917 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.22 The cause of her death was broncho pneumonia.22

        vii.  Thelma Ina Bottger (Twin) was born on 10 May 1916 in Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States,18 died on 14 Feb 1999 in Albany, Linn, Oregon, United States at age 82, and was buried on 17 Feb 1999 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.




3. Sarah C. Plunkett,2 daughter of James A. Plunkett 40 and Ashnah Norton,41 was born on 10 Jul 1878 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States, died on 16 Apr 1965 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States27 at age 86, and was buried on 19 Apr 1965 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.

Death Notes:
Oregon Vital Records, Deaths 1903-1998:

Name: Bottger, Sarah
County: Benton
Death Date: 16 Apr 1965
Certificate: 4498
Spouse: John
Age: 86

.

Burial Notes:
Oaklawn Cemetery, Corvallis, Benton Co., Oregon:
Buried 29 Apr 1965, b. 1878- d. 1965- Block 4, section 74, lot 5.

Funeral Services:

Mchenry Funeral Home, Corvallis, Oregon-2:00PM, Monday, April 19th, 1865
Rev. Charles S. Neville, Casket Bearers: Glen Plunkett, John Thompson, Bernice Plunkett, Bert Plunkett, Curt Plunkett, and Barton Plunkett, Interment: Oak Lawn Cemetery, Corvallis, Oregon

General Notes:

Noted events in her life were:

• Residence: 1940, Summit Election Precinct, Benton, Oregon. 42

• Residence: 1935, Same Place, Benton, Oregon. 42

• Census: Jun 1880, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 43

• Census: Jun 1900, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 24

• Census: 20 Apr 1910, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 4

• Census: 8 Jan 1920, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States. 4

• Census: Apr 1930, Summit, Benton, Oregon, United States. 25

• Social Security Number: 542-54-2206, May 1963.

Sarah married Johann Albin Bottger 2 on 14 Jan 1899 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.26 Johann was born on 9 Apr 1865 in Burgstadt, Saxony, Germany,20 died on 24 Jul 1949 in Philomath, Benton, Oregon, United States21 at age 84, and was buried on 26 Jul 1949 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.19 The cause of his death was Pneumonia and Uremia.19 Other names for Johann were J. A. Bottger and22 John A. Bottger.23
picture

previous  Third Generation






4. Karl Gottfried Bottger 18 was born on 16 Sep 1832 in Burkersdorf, Germany44 and died about 1907 about age 75. Another name for Karl was Carl G. Bottger.19

General Notes: Saxony, Prussia, Lutheran Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1760-1890-Ancestry.com posting: Name Auguste Amalie Bφttger Father Joh Gottlieb Bφttger Mother Joh Christ?? Bφttger Birth 19 Juli 1840 Baptism 3 Aug 1840 - Sachsen, Deutschland Vital 3 Aug 1840 - Sachsen, Deutschland - Age: 0

Karl married Amelia Harnish Hautsch.19 Amelia was born on 19 Jul 1836 in Burkersdorf, Germany and died on 5 Apr 1901 in Burkersdorf, Germany at age 64.

The child from this marriage was:

2         i.  Johann Albin Bottger 2 (born on 9 Apr 1865 in Burgstadt, Saxony, Germany - died on 24 Jul 1949 in Philomath, Benton, Oregon, United States)




5. Amelia Harnish Hautsch 19 was born on 19 Jul 1836 in Burkersdorf, Germany and died on 5 Apr 1901 in Burkersdorf, Germany at age 64.

General Notes: Last name may also be spelled Hautsch!

Amelia married Karl Gottfried Bottger.18 Karl was born on 16 Sep 1832 in Burkersdorf, Germany44 and died about 1907 about age 75. Another name for Karl was Carl G. Bottger.19


6. James A. Plunkett,40 son of Robert Plunkett Sr. 45 and Sarah Cade Canada Kennedy,46 was born on 17 Feb 1836 in Brockville, Leeds, Ontario, Canada, died on 12 Jun 1911 in , Benton County, Oregon, United States47 at age 75, and was buried on 14 Jun 1911 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.48 The cause of his death was Cerebral hemorhage resulting in paralysis from which he never recovered..49

Death Notes: Oregon Death Index:
Name: James Plunkett Death Date: 12 Jun 1911 Death Place: Benton Certificate: 4185


Corvallis, Benton County, Oregon, Weekly Gazette Times:
Plunket, James, d. 16 Jun 1911 GT4

Washington, Select Death Certificates: 1907-1960:
Name: James Plunkett Gender: Male Child: Lucus Plunkett


Washington, Select Death Certificates, 1907-1960:
Name: James Plunkett Gender: Male Child: Lucus Plunkett

Burial Notes: Gravestone next to wife Ashnah shows James and dates 1833-1911

General Notes:
Was a bass drummer in the drum corps at Ft Hoskins, Oregon under General Phil Sheridan.
Company D, 4th Regiment, California volunteers, Discharged in January 1866 and lived with his family in Kings Valley until his death in 1911 at the age of 79.

Henry County, Iowa 1850 Federal Census
This Census was transcribed by Mary Thompson and
proofread by Randy Cooley for the USGenWeb Archives

Census Project, http://www.usgenweb.org/census.
CENSUS YR: 1850 STATE or TERRITORY: Iowa COUNTY: Henry DIVISION: Trenton Twsp REEL NO: M432-184 PAGE NO: 198a
LN HN FN LAST NAME FIRST NAME AGE SEX RACE OCCUP. VAL. BIRTHPLACE
39 536 536 Plunkett James L 14 M Iowa

Oregon Census, 1841-90
James Plunkett listed for 1870,1880,1890-Benton County

BLM Land Records, Oregon:
Names
Patentee: JAMES PLUNKETT
Survey
State: OREGON
Acres: 160
Metes/Bounds: No
Title Transfer
Issue Date: 4/15/1884
Land Office: OREGON CITY
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: No
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: May 20, 1862: HOMESTEAD ENTRY-ORIGINAL (12 Stat. 392)
Document Numbers
Document Nr.: 1738
Accession/Serial Nr.: OROCAA 022707
BLM Serial Nr.: OROCAA 022707

Names
Patentee: JAMES PLUNKETT
Survey
State: OREGON
Acres: 87.15
Metes/Bounds: No
Title Transfer
Issue Date: 5/2/1870
Land Office: OREGON CITY
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: No
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: April 24, 1820: SALE-CASH ENTRY (3 Stat. 566)
Document Numbers
Document Nr.: 604
Accession/Serial Nr.: OROCAA 019261
BLM Serial Nr.: OROCAA 019261

1900 Oregon Census, Benton County Kings Valley shows James & Ashnah with sons Garfield and Henry

1930 Federal Census for daughter Sarah shows her father born in Indiana?


Ancestry.com posting:
This story describes more of my long genealogical search for information on the background and childhood family of my great-grandfather James Plunkett (1836-1911). The Oregon Plunkett family will be forever indebted to a stranger who volunteered at the National Archives Branch in San Bruno, California. Thank you, Bill Wiengartner, for turning up the first real clue by finding the Plunkett family in Van Buren County, Iowa in the 1850 census. I also wish to thank two ladies in Utah who were early researchers on the Plunkett family. They spent twenty years trying to find out "what happened to James Plunkett," whom they thought was lost from their part of the family. Challas Adams Snarr is a descendant of James Plunkett's sister Mary Melinda Plunkett Adams, and Alice Adams is not related to the Plunketts, yet she devoted many hours to helping with the search. (Meanwhile, here in Oregon I was searching for James Plunkett's family and background.) The efforts of these people made it eventually possible to reunite the Utah and Oregon branches of this family. It is my pleasure to share this story with those who may find it of interest. This is the story of the Oregon Plunkett Family's connection with the Mormons. It tells the little-known story of James Plunkett's (1836 - 1911) childhood and family of origin. The story is based on notes I made from reading many different historical sources. As far as we know, James Plunkett left his connection to the Mormons behind him when he joined the Army in California and was sent up to Ft. Hoskins, Oregon during the Civil War. This is just another part of our family's rich heritage. Patricia Plunkett (Bearden) Holler Posted by King Folk.


JAMES PLUNKETT
1836-1911
Nauvoo, Illinois
My paternal great-grandfather, James Plunkett, was born 11 February 1836 near Brockville, Leeds, Upper Canada (now the province of Ontario.) He was the third child of seven born to Robert Plunkett and his wife Sarah. We do not know what Sarah's family name was--some say Kennedy, some say Canada, Kanada or perhaps Cade.
Both parents were from Ireland, immigrants to Canada about 1830. They were Protestants from near Newtownards, County Down, in what is now British-ruled Northern Ireland. People of Presbyterian persuasion dominated both County Down and the part of Leeds County, Ontario, where they settled, so perhaps they also attended that church.
As far as we know, the Plunketts did not own land in Ontario. There they became friends with Arza Adams, a baptized early member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints or the Mormons. Adams converted the Plunkett family, and baptized James' father at Brockville on 23 March 1840. This was only ten years after Joseph Smith established the LDS Church in 1830.
In the spring of 1842 the Plunketts and other Mormon families left Canada for Nauvoo, now part of Hancock County, Illinois. LDS Church records show members of the family who arrived there were parents Robert and Sarah, with children under eight years old: James, Eleanor, Isaac and Robert Jr. The oldest son, William, was baptized into the LDS church at Nauvoo in May 1842. Daughters Mary Melinda and Ellen were also with the family.
Thousands of other Mormon converts poured into the city from the east and from Canada and the British Isles.
Nauvoo was on the Mississippi River, across from Keokuk in the southeast corner of Iowa. The river bank rises gently there to a point high up on the slope. One standing up on that hill can see the river cutting a great silver semicircle below.
In 1839, the Mormons purchased a 20,000-acre tract for $2.00 per acre, to be repaid in 20 equal installments with no interest. It lay between the Mississippi and DesMoines Rivers in the state of Illinois. Woods covered the higher parts of the land, with swamps in the lowlands.
Joseph Smith named his city Nauvoo, which in Hebrew means "a beautiful plantation." Nauvoo was headquarters of the LDS church from 1840 until 1846, when Brigham Young led the Mormons west to the Salt Lake valley in Utah.
The winter of 1839-40 brought an epidemic of "ague"--perhaps either typhoid or malaria. There were many deaths.
The Mormons drained the river swamps for the site of their city, and laid the city out in neat squares, with great planning and forethought. Streets ran directly north and south, east and west. Certain sections of the city were for public buildings and others for residential areas. Homes were a uniform distance from the street, and they planted the lots with lawns and shrubs. This was the beginning of city planning and "zoning." Neatly fenced farms spread out from the city in three directions.
Joseph Smith drew up an unusual city charter, creating a near city-state, independent of all other governmental agencies in Illinois. The only thing that could limit the powers of this city was for the state legislature to repeal the charter. No other city in America ever had such complete control of its own affairs. The legislature approved the charter in December 1840. The Mormons invited people of all religious denominations to live in Nauvoo.
The Charter gave the City Council power to "make, ordain, establish and execute all such ordinances not repugnant to the Constitution of the United States of or this State." This was an ingenious wording which Smith later interpreted in the widest possible sense. They rushed the Charter through the Illinois legislature. It passed without ever being read except by title, in exchange for promises of Mormon favor to the leaders of both the Democratic and Whig political parties. Previously, Smith made it clear that his people would join neither party, but would hold themselves free to vote according to services rendered.
Smith thought the ideal government was a theocracy, a government by a prophet specially chosen to administer the laws of God.
Smith's charter provided for a university and called for the organization of militia called the Nauvoo Legion.
A Nauvoo city ordinance forbid anyone to set up a business without a license from the City Council, which Joseph Smith dominated. But this law caused so much resentment that they repealed it in 1842.
There were no saloons in Nauvoo. If a man wanted to drink, he had to buy his whiskey from a shop specially licensed by the Mayor, and take it home with him. Later Smith allowed construction of a brewery and allowed it to advertise in the Nauvoo Neighbor newspaper. But Smith controlled the dispensing of liquor and preached against grog shops.
For a while, the city did have a brothel, just one square away from the temple. It used a grocery store as a front. In 1842 the City Council termed it a nuisance and some soldiers from the Legion tipped it over backwards into a gully, where it crashed to the bottom By 1840, Nauvoo had 250 homes, with many more under construction. The average price of a city lot in Nauvoo was $500. Smith set aside the square at the very summit of the city for a temple. The Mormons cut the timber, drained the swamps, and then laid the cornerstone for the immense temple.
The site of the great Temple of God became the real center of the city. Temple construction began in 1841, on the highest land in the city. Even its unfinished walls were visible from the flat surrounding countryside. Work on the temple continued every day except Sundays and holidays, although at times construction stopped temporarily for lack of funds.
Laborers and skilled craftsmen who lacked employment worked on the temple. Although their pay was uncertain and consisted of donated food and clothing, work on the huge structure was always a labor of love. All Nauvoo men were expected to spend each tenth day working there, or else to give the equivalent in goods or money. My great-great grandfather was a stone mason, and he helped to build the temple. My great-grandfather and his brothers were too young to be much help in construction work, but oral family history says that they carried water for the laborers and did other chores.
The citizens of Nauvoo built for Smith and made unbelievable sacrifices to carry out his orders. They did this not only because they were convinced he was God's prophet, but also because they loved Joseph Smith as a man.
Smith aimed to educate all of his people, young and old, so Nauvoo had an educational system that included all ages from elementary to university classes. Smith made learning a Mormon ideal.
Nauvoo bordered the river and had farmlands on three sides. The farmers used the most advanced agricultural knowledge of the day. But the farms were unusual, for no one lived on the farmland. Everyone lived in the city, commuting to the rural areas to work during the day. Farmers who had no money to buy land could raise crops on a huge community farm just outside the city.
Nauvoo was above some river rapids that prevented the largest steamboats from going that far north. Smith planned to remedy this problem by building a wing dam in the Mississippi River. That would make an ideal harbor and also furnish water power for Nauvoo's industry. Until the dam could be constructed, Smith decided to have a Mormon port in Warren, Illinois, which he connected to Nauvoo by rail.
Smith continually urged his city toward industrialization. By 1842, Nauvoo had two big steam sawmills, a steam flour mill, a tool factory, and a foundry. The Mormons had plans for a chinaware factory, to be manned by English converts from the Staffordshire potteries.
As early as May 1842, the New York Herald reported the rumor that men in Nauvoo had a "community of wives," as the practice of polygamy or plural marriage became more common among the Mormons. My Mormon cousins say that the Plunketts did not practice polygamy, and did not believe in it. The bulk of the Mormon colony knew little or nothing about polygamy. The majority accepted the word of church leaders that the system had disappeared.
At its peak the city's population rivaled that of the young city of Chicago. In 1842 the New York Herald reported that the city had a population of 10,000, and 30,000 beyond the city limits. Also, the Legion had "2000 pretty well disciplined" troops.
Then, Nauvoo had an unmistakably military atmosphere. The Legion drilled regularly, with smartly-uniformed officers. Every able-bodied male between 18 and 45 was compelled to join, and heavy fines were imposed for failure to appear at parade. The Legion was organized as a corps of riflemen, while other units in other cities in Illinois were armed mostly with swords and muskets.
Joseph Smith wore a grand uniform: a blue coat with lots of gold braid, buff trousers, high military boots, and a hat with ostrich feathers. He asked the governor for, and received, the commission of Lt. General. Smith came to prefer the title "General" even over that of "President." He carried a sword on his hip, and two big horse-pistols. He loved parades and pomp and splendor, so he called out the Legion on every possible occasion, marching at its head on his magnificent black stallion named Charlie.
In 1840 Joseph Smith feared extradition to Missouri, where he was a fugitive from justice for earlier troubles. He appointed a bodyguard of 12 men, his toughest fighters and most devoted friends. The bodyguards dressed in white uniforms, and made a pretty sight marching and wheeling about the uniformed figure of their chief in Legion parades.
Mary Melinda Plunkett, my great-grandfather's older sister, told her children that she was well acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and his wife Emma. The Smiths always rode by horseback to church on Sundays. Mary remembered waiting with other older children outside the meeting house to watch them come riding up on their beautiful horses.
Military spirit infected all the young boys in Nauvoo, and Smith organized them into a military corps of their own. Between 400 and 600 boys, probably including the Plunkett boys, paraded and drilled with as much zest as their fathers.
Once the boys' army decided to invade Nauvoo. The Legion, prepared to give the boys a good scare, lined up to meet them. But the men didn't know that the boys had raided their mothers' kitchens for pots and pans. When the boys charged out of the woods, beating on kettles and shouting, the Legion's horses panicked and refused to charge. Finally, Smith spurred Charlie forward, squarely into the group of oncoming boys. They scattered, and the Prophet became the hero of the day for repelling the "invasion."
Life in Nauvoo had its fun times as well. Tent theaters visited the city, and there were band concerts and lectures. Only mesmerists and magicians were denied an audience. Joseph Smith held elegant cotillion parties in his big home, called the Mansion House. It was a large home, transformed into a hotel. The Smith family lived in spacious quarters upstairs, while the huge living room below became a lobby and public dining hall.
Hundreds of tourists came to Nauvoo. Steamboats regularly stopped to discharge visitors, who were ceremoniously conducted on a tour of the city. The visitors were shown several mummies kept on display there in the Nauvoo museum, and the new temple.
Nauvoo became a great social center for communities up and down that part of the Mississippi River. Citizens held great celebrations on Independence Day and other holidays, and excursion boats came from as far away as St. Louis to bring people to the festivities. The city was beautiful, and known for the hospitality of its people.
In 1844, at Nauvoo, the last Plunkett child was born. They named the baby Joseph, after church leader Joseph Smith. He lived less than a year, dying at Nauvoo in late June 1845 from inflammation of the brain.
The Mormons believed in cooperation instead of competition. The success of their settlement drew the attention of surrounding areas, and brought fears that the Mormons would soon overtake the state of Illinois. Land speculators were common at the time, but they could not get a toe-hold in Nauvoo, because the church bought large tracts of land and then resold it to the people at non-profit prices.
Nauvoo was an interesting place for the Plunkett children to live. From the historical accounts of the city, it sounds like there was always something going on.
This pleasant life came to a halt in June 1844, when Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were killed by gunfire while lodged in the county jail at nearby Carthage, Illinois. Later, in early 1846 some 30,000 Mormons fled the city under leadership of Brigham Young, eventually making their well-known exodus to Utah. Young requested the Plunketts to stay for a time in Van Buren County, Iowa, to help grow crops to feed the thousands of refugees. The Plunkett family were among the last to arrive in Utah, remaining in Iowa until 1852.
There are only a few homes left today in Nauvoo. The Mormons never completed their Nauvoo temple, and later its unfinished walls were destroyed by fire.
The Mormons now operate Nauvoo as a National Historic Landmark.
I visited Nauvoo twice during the 1970's, arriving via the steamboat
Delta Queen. I was only there because the boat stopped there, and it was only of mild historical interest to me, as then I knew nothing about the Plunkett connection to the Mormons. I didn't dream that my own ancestors lived there during the height of the city's glory. It wasn't until the late 1980's that I discovered this part of my heritage. Since then I have read many books about the subject. Now, a visit to Nauvoo would be a fascinating experience.
My father remembered James Plunkett saying that he did not want his family to know anything about the background that he left behind him when he joined the Army in California and was sent to Oregon during the Civil War. And for many more years, we didn't know. Now, we have identified this part of our heritage. And, as far as we know, James Plunkett left any connection with the Mormons behind when the U. S. Army sent him to Oregon.
Patricia Plunkett Bearden

_______
Ancestry.com posting:
H. B. M. Jolley Organized Overland Company
The Plunkett family came to Utah with the Henry B. M. Jolley Overland Company. They left Kanesville, Iowa in June 1852 with a total of 340 souls. They arrived in Salt Lake, Utah September 15, 1852. Source: L. D. S. Church Emigration records, published in unnamed book, page 339. From the files of Challas Snarr.

Research Notes: Not yet sure how this family is connected:
Corvallis Gazette Times, Oct 20, 2007
Riedy ? Sleeman wedding

Amy Colette Riedy and Joshua Lyndon Sleeman were married Sept. 1, 2007, at the homestead of the groom's great-great-great-grandparents, James and Ashna Norton Plunkett, now known as Beazell Memorial Forest Park in Kings Valley. The groom resided in the house on-site upon birth. Dr. Will Keim presided.

Amy is the daughter of Elden and Lynda Riedy of Albany. She is a 1993 graduate of Corvallis High School and graduated from Phagans Beauty College in 1998. She is a self-employed hair stylist working at The Rage salon in Corvallis.

Joshua is the son of Larry and Lori Sleeman of Corvallis and the late Larry D. Ham. He is a 1995 graduate of Philomath High School and is a student at Oregon State University where he is studying natural resources. He works for the Oregon Department of Forestry in Philomath.

The maid of honor was Sabra Sailor and the bridesmaid was Alicia Barney, both friends of the bride. The best men were Mitch Sleeman and Trevor Sleeman, brothers of the groom, and the ushers were Levi Rowley and Ryan Rowley, cousins of the groom. The ring bearers were Grant and Jack Konrade, second cousins of the bride, from Topeka, Kan.

The couple honeymooned in their favorite spot, Wailea, Maui, Hawaii, and make their home in Philomath.

Noted events in his life were:

• Military: Camp Harney, Harney County, Oregon, United States.

• Occupation: Farmer.

• Alt. Birth: 17 Feb 1833, , , Illinois, United States.

• Alt. Birth: 17 Feb 1836, Decorah, Winneshiek, Iowa, United States. 50

• Residence: 1839, Oakland, Alameda, California, United States. 51

• Census: Oct 1850, Washington Township, Van Buren County, Iowa, United States. 52

• Census: 1860, , Amador County, California, United States.

• Military: 1861, Linden, San Joaquin, California, United States.

• Military: Sep 1861, Fort Hoskins, Benton County, Oregon, United States.

• Military: 28 Sep 1861, Placerville, El Dorado, California, United States.

• Military: Dec 1863, Fort Hoskins, Benton, Oregon Territory.

• Property: Real Estate $1,000 and Personal Property $1,055, 20 Jun 1870, Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Census: Jun 1880, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 43

• Census: 1890, , Benton County, Oregon, United States.

• Social Security Application:

James married Ashnah Norton 41 on 28 Jun 1864 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.54 Ashnah was born on 8 Feb 1847 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon Territory, United States,55 died on 14 Apr 1933 in Blodgett, Benton, Oregon, United States56 at age 86, and was buried on 16 Apr 1933 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.57 The cause of her death was Angina Pectoris.58 Other names for Ashnah were Ashna P. Norton and59 Ashney Plunkett.60

Marriage Notes: Benton County Court House, Corvallis, Benton County, Oregon:
Marriages:
James Plunkett and Ashnah Norton, Book B, Page 75b
28 Jun 1864


Obituary: on April 15 shows married on June 28, 1963.

Oregon, County Marriages, 1851-1975:
Name: Ashnah
[Ashnah Norton] Gender: Female Age: 15 Birth Date: abt 1849 Marriage Date: Jun 1864 Marriage Place: Benton, Oregon, USA Father: Hopestill Norton Spouse: James Plankett Film Number: 004393882

Noted events in their marriage were:

• Alt. Marriage: 26 Jun 1864, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Residence: Mar 1865, Fort Hoskins, Benton County, Oregon, United States.

• Census: 20 Jun 1870, Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Census: Jun 1880, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 43

• Census: 1890, , Benton County, Oregon, United States.

• Census: Jun 1900, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 24

• Census: 1910, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 61

Children from this marriage were:

          i.  Lucius Plunkett 62 was born on 26 Jun 1865 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States, died on 12 Feb 1926 in Chehalis, Lewis, Washington, United States at age 60, and was buried on 15 Feb 1926 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. Other names for Lucius were Loosh and63 L. Plunkett.64

         ii.  Wiley M. Plunkett 65 was born on 17 Feb 1867 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States,66 died on 5 Jul 1934 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States67 at age 67, and was buried on 6 Jul 1934 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.65

        iii.  Frank A. Plunkett 68 was born on 5 May 1869 in Blodgett, Benton, Oregon, United States,68 died on 7 Mar 1946 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States69 at age 76, and was buried on 9 Mar 1946 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.

         iv.  Barton Plunkett was born on 30 Aug 1871 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States, died on 26 Sep 1875 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States70 at age 4, and was buried in Sep 1875 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. The cause of his death was Injuries from being struck by a baseball while playing.71

          v.  Edgar Plunkett 72 was born on 19 Jun 1873 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States,73 died on 30 May 1935 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States74 at age 61, and was buried on 1 Jun 1935 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. The cause of his death was Pneumonia. Another name for Edgar was Ed Plunkett.70

         vi.  Bertha Plunkett 75 was born on 1 Mar 1876 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States,76 died on 8 Feb 1957 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States77 at age 80, and was buried on 11 Feb 1957 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.78

3       vii.  Sarah C. Plunkett 2 (born on 10 Jul 1878 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States - died on 16 Apr 1965 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States)

       viii.  Garfield Plunkett 79 was born on 17 Apr 1881 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States,80 died on 14 Mar 1942 in Sweet Home, Linn, Oregon, United States81 at age 60, and was buried on 16 Mar 1942 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.82 The cause of his death was carcenoma of the colon.83 Another name for Garfield was Gary.63

         ix.  Henry Plunkett 84 was born on 25 Jun 1883 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States,85 died on 11 Oct 1960 in Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States86 at age 77, and was buried on 13 Oct 1960 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.87




7. Ashnah Norton,41 daughter of Lucius Carolus Norton Sr. 88 and Hopestill S. King,89 was born on 8 Feb 1847 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon Territory, United States,55 died on 14 Apr 1933 in Blodgett, Benton, Oregon, United States56 at age 86, and was buried on 16 Apr 1933 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.57 The cause of her death was Angina Pectoris.58 Other names for Ashnah were Ashna P. Norton and59 Ashney Plunkett.60

Birth Notes: Bottger Family Tree made at the birth of Mary Pearl Bottger (1925) shows Ashna Norton born Feb 8, 1840, Kings Valley, Oregon.

Death Notes:
Oregon Death Index

Name: Plunkett, Ashna
County: Benton
Death Date: 14 Apr 1933
Certificate: 47
Spouse: James

April 15, 1933 Obituary: Ashna Plunkett died at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the home of her daughter Mrs. J.A. Thompson at Blodgett.

Burial Notes: Graveside Services: 2 o'clock on Sunday, April 16th, 1933-Kings Valley Cemetery.

General Notes:
May have been the first or one of the first white child born in Kings Valley, Benton County, Oregon

Early Oregonians Index, 1800-1860:
Name: Ashna J Norton
[Ashnah Norton] Birth Date: 8 Feb 1847 Birth Place: Benton, Oregon Territory, USA Death Date: 14 Apr 1933 Death Place: Benton, Oregon, USA Cemetery: Kings Valley Cemetery

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1850, , , Oregon Territory, United States. 90

• Census: Jul 1860, , Benton County, Oregon, United States.

• Census: 20 Jun 1870, Corvallis, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Census: Jun 1880, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 43

• Census: Jun 1900, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 24

• Census: 1910, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 61

• Census: 7 Jan 1920, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Residence: 20 Jun 1925, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States. 70

• Census: 19 Apr 1930, Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.

• Social Security Application:

Ashnah married James A. Plunkett 40 on 28 Jun 1864 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.54 James was born on 17 Feb 1836 in Brockville, Leeds, Ontario, Canada, died on 12 Jun 1911 in , Benton County, Oregon, United States47 at age 75, and was buried on 14 Jun 1911 in Kings Valley, Benton, Oregon, United States.48 The cause of his death was Cerebral hemorhage resulting in paralysis from which he never recovered..49


Home | Table of Contents | Surnames | Name List

This Web Site was Created 5 Apr 2018 with Legacy 9.0 from Millennia